25
Jul

ALUMINIUM BOTTLES ‘OUT-GLASS’ THE COMPETITION Since prehistoric times, bottle containers have been created from clay or asphalt, then later glass. The earliest bottles were used to contain perfume. By 1872 bottles were being used to contain carbonated drinks. The humble bottle has now entered the Aluminium age. Beer and other beverages are increasingly offered in aluminium bottles. The corrosion resistant Aluminium packaging keeps the drink cold and removes the danger posed by broken glass. There is a significant weight saving, the aluminium unit weighing 20% of its contemporary. This saves on emissions in the transport of the packaging and delivery to the retail outlet. Direct printing onto the bottle dispenses with the need for labelling.
25
Jul

PRECISE ALUMINIUM KEEPS TIME The aluminium based Quantum Clock is 37 times more precise than the existing international standard. It confines aluminum and beryllium ions together in an electromagnetic trap. The clock loses one second every 3.4 billion years. The aluminum clock is very accurate because it is insensitive to background magnetic and electric fields and to temperature. In February 2010 an enhanced version of the quantum logic clock was made using a single Aluminum atom. Considered the world's most precise clock, it offers more than twice the precision of the original. “Every second counts!”
25
Jul

BIONIC ALUMINIUM EXOSKELETON OFFERS MOBILITY The recent development of motorized Aluminium exoskeletons has provided mobility for paraplegics. The suit is strapped onto the user’s legs and incorporates tilt sensors and motors. The device does not do the walking; its movement is stimulated by the exertion of the user to enhance their ability to walk. Next-generation devices will push new boundaries in mind-body-device control. Englishwoman Claire Lomas, paralyzed from the waist down after a horse-riding accident in 2006, completed all 26.2 miles of the London Marathon in 16 days using one of these devices. The requirement for lightweight durable material made Aluminium the obvious choice.
25
Jul

SKY HIGH ALUMINIUM Without light weight, strong, and corrosion resistant Aluminium this iconic aeroplane could not have flown. Once heard, the sound of the Merlin engine in the Spitfire is never forgotten. Extensive use of Aluminium in key components such as the V12 engine block, crankcase, and pistons enabled sufficient power to weight ratio to deliver maximum performance. These machines could achieve 350-400mph (570-650kph) operating at 20,000ft (6000m). The Spitfire was a familiar sight in the skies over Britain throughout World War II, widely recognised for its role in the ‘Battle of Britain’ during 1940.
25
Jul

PRANCING HORSE POWER Always recognisable by the style and beauty of design, Ferrari cars turn heads on every continent. In its quest to make lighter cars the latest ‘Prancing Horse’ is casting its lot with Aluminium as the lightweight material of choice. Ferrari insists that Aluminium is superior for most cars and so the new 458 Italia uses Aluminium castings, extrusions, and stamped sheet. As the company has learned how to form and shape Aluminium they have reduced the sheet thickness to 0.9mm, the castings that serve as the focal point of the structure have also shrunk. In some places Ferrari uses a casting as thin as 2mm. The successor to the 458 will also be Aluminium and could weight as little as 1,180Kg.

Write to Us

National Metalforming Centre,
47 Birmingham Road,
West Bromwich,
West Midlands,
B70 6PY

Communications